Education


Kohl Elementary School’s Student Stewards of the Lower Calaveras are teaming up with FLCR to treat the community to music, crafts, science demonstrations, history, and nature appreciation.

“Home base” is the University of the Pacific DeRosa University Center 2nd story deck, overlooking the river we love. Parking is available at either end of the footbridge.

Sunday, October 30, 11am – 1pm

calaveras-river-family-fun-day-30oct16-flier

How is the drought impacting SJ County water supply and river conservation?

 

FIND OUT AT THE SAN JOAQUIN STATE OF OUR RIVERS SYMPOSIUM!

WHEN: THURSDAY, APRIL 16, 2015

TIME: 9:00 AM – 3:00 PM  (CHECK-IN AT 8:30 AM)

WHERE: 555 E. Weber Ave., Stockton CA 95202

FREE ADMISSION!
BREAKFAST, LUNCH, AND REFRESHMENTS WILL BE PROVIDED!
PARKING AVAILABLE AT THE CENTRAL PARKING GARAGE

The continuing disappearance of Earth’s last healthy ecosystems, on land and in the oceans, is sadly no longer news. What is news is that saving these ecosystems is affordable and even profitable. An investor-driven approach to conservation finance has the potential to preserve these vital areas, and with them the planet’s natural capital stock of clean air, fresh water and species diversity.

Conservation finance represents an undeveloped private sector investment opportunity of major proportion. Our research suggests private investors—wealthy individuals, pension funds and other institutional investors and even mainstream retail investors—could supply as much as $200 billion to $300 billion per year needed to preserve the world’s most important ecosystems, ranging from the Borneo rainforest in Malaysia and Indonesia to the African Rift lake system of Rwanda and Uganda.

Click here to read more at www.ssireview.org

The environmental movement faces a serious challenge. More people are more disconnected from natural systems than at any other time in the history of humanity. The reasons and evidence for this are so obvious that they hardly bear repeating. In short, most of us live in vast urban areas where the rhythms and patterns of wild nature are almost totally obscured. Nor do we have much interaction with what I would call “pastoral nature,” meaning agricultural landscapes. I think it’s fair to say that most Americans couldn’t tell a spruce from a hemlock, or an adolescent cabbage from an adolescent beet. In our post-industrial world, such knowledge is superfluous. If all of your basic needs are met through the modern magic of fossil fuels and industrial farming, then it’s easy to ignore nonhuman nature, to forget that it even exists.

Click here to read more at alternet.org

Here’s a quirky quiz posted on the BBC Nature site to see how much of a worldwide wildlife wonk you are. Happy New Year!

Click here to take the quiz

Posted by: Courtney Sexton, Defenders

The Defenders team in California is often on the ground in the local communities working on hands-on projects that engage community members in conservation activities. This is a great way to show people how the policies we strive to implement on the legal level are directly connected to real wildlife issues. Below, two partners of Defenders write about their experiences helping out with some of our popular grassroots projects in California.

In 2008, Defender Jeremy Terhune helped found the Friends of the Lower Calaveras River (FLCR) project. Defenders now supports Jeremy in his work to build support for wildlands, wildlife and river conservation in the Central Valley as an organizer based in Stockton, CA. Jeremy focuses on building constituency support for the San Joaquin River Restoration Project and participating in the San Joaquin River Partnership, as well as continuing his work to protect the Lower Calaveras River and educating under-served communities and children in the planning, design and use of river restoration projects in the San Joaquin Valley.

Click here to read more at Defendersblog.org

Photo by Jim Marsh

Of all the photos naturalist Jim Marsh has taken along the Calaveras River, this one would seem to be the least “natural.”

But it just might tell the story best.

Marsh has spent the past year regularly visiting a 3-acre portion of the Calaveras where native grasses were planted last winter in a modest effort to restore the glorified drainage ditch.

During his weekly visits, Marsh does what most of us would never think to do along that stream. He opens his eyes. There isn’t much to see yet in the restoration area, or so it would seem, but Marsh has found surprising beauty even in the smallest insects and flowers found at the site. He also listens to the ambient noise — the wind, the birds, the bustle of the surrounding city. His observations are written down in a journal.

– See more at: http://blogs.esanjoaquin.com/san-joaquin-river-delta/2013/12/03/a-river-that-talks/#sthash.Wx2oCgFh.dpuf

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