How is the drought impacting SJ County water supply and river conservation?

 

FIND OUT AT THE SAN JOAQUIN STATE OF OUR RIVERS SYMPOSIUM!

WHEN: THURSDAY, APRIL 16, 2015

TIME: 9:00 AM – 3:00 PM  (CHECK-IN AT 8:30 AM)

WHERE: 555 E. Weber Ave., Stockton CA 95202

FREE ADMISSION!
BREAKFAST, LUNCH, AND REFRESHMENTS WILL BE PROVIDED!
PARKING AVAILABLE AT THE CENTRAL PARKING GARAGE

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Starting next month, millions of young California salmon could be migrating to the ocean in tanker trucks instead of swimming downstream in the Sacramento River.

On Monday, state and federal wildlife officials announced a plan to move hatchery-raised salmon by truck in the event the state’s ongoing drought makes the Sacramento River and its tributaries inhospitable for the fish. They fear the rivers could become too shallow and warm to sustain salmon trying to migrate to sea on their own.

Shrunken habitat could deplete food supply for the young fish, and make them easier prey for predators. It also would make the water warmer, which can be lethal to salmon.

 

Alex Breitler, Record

More than 20,000 salmon splashed up San Joaquin Valley streams to spawn last year, a relatively robust return that you’d think would bode well for future populations.

But now biologists are worried that the offspring of those fish will not survive, because there’s simply not enough water to flush the babies back downstream toward the ocean.

And if they don’t make it out alive, that means fewer adult salmon returning to our rivers three years down the road.

Click here to read more at Recordnet.com

"U.S. Drought Monitor. Here's what you need to know: Red is bad." - Breitler

“U.S. Drought Monitor. Here’s what you need to know: Red is bad.” – Breitler

 

Click here to read Alex Breitler’s post on his blog.

The drought that has been afflicting most of the Western states for 13 years may be a “megadrought,” and the likelihood is high that this century could see a multidecade dry spell like nothing else seen for 1,000 years, according to research presented at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting last week.

Today, drought or abnormally dry conditions are affecting every state west of the Mississippi Riverand many on the East Coast, with much of the Southwest under long-term severe, extreme or exceptional drought conditions. Drought conditionsnationwide are down this year, but they remain entrenched in the West.

 

A Retrospective Estimate of the Economic Impacts of Reduced Water Supplies to the San Joaquin Valley in 2009

By Jeffrey Michael, Richard Howitt, Josué Medellín-Azuara, and Duncan MacEwan1, Sept. 28, 2010

The effect of reduced water supplies as a result of drought and environmental pumping restrictions in 2009 on the San Joaquin Valley economy was, and continues to be, the subject of significant discussion. Economic effects were quantified in terms of agricultural production, revenues, and jobs and income. In the midst of a severe recession, it is no surprise that job loss estimates generated the most interest and debate. In the months following the 2009 growing season, data have been released that offer a clearer picture of the effects of reduced water supplies. As such, the purpose of this report is to take a retrospective look back at 2009 and summarize changes in agricultural production and employment in the San Joaquin Valley due to reduced water supplies. Model results and survey data now closely coincide and provide conclusive evidence on the final effects of reduced water supplies in 2009.

Click here to read the report at Pacific.edu

By: Dan Bacher

Patrick Porgans and Lloyd Carter reveal that while the federal and state officials are seemingly still at odds as to whether the “drought” is over, a review of the government’s data indicates that contrary to the wolf cries of Fox, CBS, the Governor and water officials, the recent California “drought” was very mild at best in comparison to historical droughts.

Click here to read more at Indybay.org